Proxy Parent Foundation safeguards public benefits for disabled persons through the PLAN of California Master Pooled Trust and provides “family like” Personal Support Services for people with mental illness and other brain disorders.

Our Expertise

Proxy Parent Foundation is a perfect example of marrying the expertise of the business world with the altruism of the nonprofit world. Proxy Parent Foundation provides services more efficiently and cost effectively than can be provided independently while assuring that disabled people can thrive in society and experience a real quality of life.

Our Services

Trustee: Proxy Parent Foundation is the trustee of the PLAN of California Master Pooled Trust. It can accommodate either first party “self-settled” or third party “family-generated” special needs trusts. The Proxy Parent Foundation PLAN of California Master Pooled Trust has no asset minimum and is open to all ages and disability types.

Personal Support Services: Just like a loving family, Proxy Parent Foundation helps coordinate public and private social services and medical care for PLAN of California Special Needs Trust beneficiaries with mental illness and other brain disorders. Proxy Parent Foundation helps answer their families’ question: Who will care when I’m not there? Our Personal Support Services for people with mental illness and other brain disorders may include help in finding suitable housing, providing medication education, life skills tutoring, social activities and friendship.

Proxy Parent Foundation, a dba of Planned Lifetime Assistance Network (PLAN) of California, is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, serving disabled people since 1991.

Proxy Parent Foundation’s services are available throughout California.

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WHO TO DESIGNATE AS TRUSTEE?

By Baron Miller, Esq,

Clients of mine who want to establish a special needs trust for someone with a mental illness frequently share a common challenge: who to designate as the trustee? It is a daunting problem, since the trustee often is expected to try to fill the shoes of the person establishing the trust, a person who likely has long been dealing with the formidable job of caring for a person with mental illness. How is someone else going to do what we do, with our knowledge gained from experience, with our devotion forged by love, compassion, responsibility and duty?

Clients ask me what do I think, who do I recommend. There are numerous options – family members and friends, private fiduciaries, financial institutions, non-profit organizations, financial advisors, attorneys and accountants. Depending on the situation, each has something to offer as a potential trustee. Each has drawbacks too.

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